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Crosscut is the Northwest’s independent, nonprofit digital news site that serves the public with local stories that are in-depth and unique. Crosscut is a service of Cascade Public Media. Contact: https://crosscut.com/contact-us
 
DJ CrossCut aus Berlin ist seit über 15 Jahren als mobiler Event-DJ hauptsächlich auf Hochzeiten, Geburtstagen und Firmen-Events unterwegs. Feste Pauschalpreise, ein kostenloses Vorgespräch und die Möglichkeit mir euren Musikgeschmack durch einen Musikwunschbogen mitzuteilen gehören dazu. Gerne spiele ich eure Musikwünsche bei eurem Event. Modernste Technik und professionelles Licht- und Tonequipment bringe ich immer mit. Musikstil: Aktuelle Charts, Dance-Classics, Oldies, Rock-Music, Standa ...
 
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show series
 
The founders of The 19th share the lessons learned in the first year of their industry-bending journalism startup. Over the past two decades, the journalism industry has experienced a lot of change. Much of that transformation has been bad: shrinking page counts, shrinking budgets and, ultimately, shrinking newsrooms. In recent years, though, the k…
 
The two journalists discuss how the decisions following the attacks of Sept. 11 led to distrust and division. Racism, inequity and political polarization have been a part of American history since the beginning of the country. And yet, all of the issues have exploded in the past few years as Americans have become more polarized than they have been …
 
He talked a big game during the presidential campaign. Our guests look at what the president is doing in his first year to back that up. Democratic control of the federal government was far from certain heading into the 2020 general election. But following the election of Joe Biden to the presidency and Georgia's two Senate seats going blue, an une…
 
The ‘White Fragility’ author and Slate podcast host Jason Johnson discuss the massive cultural changes since the murder of George Floyd. In the months after the murder of George Floyd, many institutions and white people across the country were openly grappling with the idea of whiteness — in particular, what responsibility white people and white-le…
 
Is it still ethical to ski and hike? How is raising a kid to love the outdoors changing? The director of the UW Climate Impacts Group talks us through those questions. For a long time, climate change was more of a theoretical threat for many people. While certain events would underline the threat the scientists were warning the world about, they we…
 
Three leaders of Seattle institutions discuss the ways a year without in-person events disrupted worlds and how it transformed how they do their work. Before the pandemic, it could be easy to take the live arts for granted. In a city like Seattle, on any given night, audiences gathered in all kinds of spaces to take in a performance or a screening.…
 
The senior senator from Minnesota talks about Facebook, Google and Amazon and if antitrust legislation is the answer. In the last two decades, tech behemoths like Facebook, Google and Amazon have become essential to the lives of millions of Americans. They have also become more and more troubling to those concerned about privacy, disinformation and…
 
In conversation with journalist Soledad O'Brien, the historians discuss the stories found in their anthology, ‘Four Hundred Souls,’ and what a “community history” can reveal. It's impossible to tell the complete story of the United States of America without talking about the experience of Black Americans. Yet Americans can't agree on exactly how mu…
 
The Connecticut senator discusses the origins of gun violence in the U.S. and how the debate around this may be changing. The United States holds a distinction among wealthy nations for the number of gun deaths that occur each year. And the argument over what to do about gun violence has become a part of the national identity. In recent decades the…
 
Three experts on religion discuss the history, the meaning and the possible hypocrisy of an unlikely union. When Donald Trump won the White House in 2016, he did so with the overwhelming support of white evangelical Christians. And through the tumultuous four years of his presidency, the faithful stood with him to the dismay of many. Critics conten…
 
Journalists Sonia Shah and Abrahm Lustgarten discuss what happens when people must flee from drought, fire and floods. Human beings are a migratory species. We have moved for food, for economic opportunity and for safety from prosecution. And now, more and more, people are moving to escape the deleterious effects of climate change. How people think…
 
The travel expert shares his vision of globetrotting when the pandemic ends. After a year of being homebound by a raging pandemic, Americans are traveling again. But while rising vaccination rates have normalized weekend trips to the coast or across borders to see family, traveling abroad is still an iffy proposition. Over the past few weeks, many …
 
The Washington state secretary of health discusses the state's decision to remove restrictions, the risks that come with it, and the strange and hopeful new reality Washingtonians are about to enter. As vaccination numbers have ticked up and COVID-19 infections have gone down, states across the country have dropped mask mandates and lifted restrict…
 
The former Secretary of Defense for Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama has strong opinions on the United States’ place in the world. That America has been an exceptional power in the years following the end of the Cold War is of little doubt. With the fall of the Soviet Union, the United States stood alone in its power to influence global e…
 
Former Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin and organizer Shaun Scott discuss the anti-racist movement and whether it will result in lasting change. It's been just over a year since George Floyd was murdered by Minneapolis police, and the fallout continues to shape conversations and culture. This time last year, the streets of Seattle — as in so man…
 
Adam Jentleson and Ellie Mystal discuss the structural issues they say threaten how we govern, and the solutions they believe are within reach. The battle over the fate of American democracy has heated up in the past few months, as pundits and political leaders spar over issues of accountability and reform. Much of the conversation has revolved aro…
 
The senior senator from Montana discusses the challenges facing Democrats as they try to convince red state voters to go green. The impacts of climate change are felt across the political spectrum, from the blue coastal cities contending with rising oceans to the red rural communities where drought and deluge upend growing seasons. Yet convincing r…
 
The congresswoman from Seattle speaks about the importance of grassroots activism and how to make it effective. Rep. Pramila Jayapal embodies change. As a progressive lawmaker, the Democratic congresswoman from Seattle is someone whose job is to press for political change. But she also represents a sea change in the world of activism. Jayapal's lif…
 
The historian discusses how the battle between North and South lives on in American politics today. Deep partisanship defines American politics in the 21st century. But division is nothing new to the country. Long before modern Democrats and Republicans were at loggerheads over health care and tax policy, Americans fought over the fate of the count…
 
Months after losing the presidency and the Senate majority, the Republican Party is at a defining moment. Which way will it go? That the Republican Party is undergoing a very public reckoning isn't really in question. But, depending on where you sit on the political spectrum, that reckoning can look very different. Is a GOP in free fall doomed to s…
 
Three Seattle artists discuss disruption, unrest and the pain — and healing — that comes from making art. All art, whether searingly relevant or seemingly superficial, has a kind of political weight to it. Murals, photography, printmaking and performance can help shape our perception of reality, challenging certain ways of living and thinking, and …
 
Almost a year since the protests that led to her resignation, Former Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best tells us what she thinks should be done to fix the force. When Best was appointed Seattle police chief in 2018, many in the community celebrated. As the first Black woman to hold the post, her ascent was notable, especially for a department that wa…
 
The famed scientist says she sees threats everywhere, but she also sees reasons to believe humans can save themselves and the environment. It has been a difficult year for everyone, and Dr. Jane Goodall is no exception. The famed primatologist, anthropologist and ethologist has been waiting out the pandemic at her family home in England at a time w…
 
‘Hidden Barriers’ producer Jen Dev and health justice educator Edwin Lindo on raising awareness of and seeking solutions to systemic racism in the health care industry. When Dr. Ben Danielson resigned in protest from his post with Seattle Children's late last year, he provided a rallying point for those seeking changes to a health care industry tha…
 
Dr. Nicholas Christakis discusses the future course of COVID-19 and the world it will leave behind. It's been a little over a year now since the novel coronavirus was declared a pandemic and normal life in America -- and around the world -- came to a screeching halt. Since then, vaccines have been developed and deployed, but uncertainty remains. Va…
 
Citizen University CEO Eric Liu talks about all that separates Americans and whether coming together is really possible.Division has become an everyday reality for most Americans. Reading or scrolling through the news inevitably leads to some kind of partisan rancor or social conflict. And it can be difficult to think that there is anything other t…
 
'Coded Bias' filmmaker Shalini Kantayya and researcher Meredith Broussard dissect the inequities perpetuated and created by emergent technologies. Every day, human beings use technology that would have been unthinkable just a few decades ago. But while the biometric computation and artificial intelligence that drive much of this tech have the sheen…
 
The former medical director of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic shares his surprise at the support he received in his protest against the hospital and thoughts on what’s next. When Danielson resigned in protest from his position as medical director of the Odessa Brown Children's Clinic late last year, he ended two decades in a role he regarded as his…
 
Journalists Leah Sottile and Bill Morlin talk about how America’s history of racist, anti-government action culminated in the Jan. 6 attack. It appears that the first chapter of the Jan. 6 insurrection has come to a close with the acquittal of former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial earlier this month. But this isn’t really the first…
 
The Seattle Public Schools superintendent discusses her plans to keep students and teachers healthy while reopening, and reflects on how the district could have better responded to the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has made this one of the most unusual and challenging school years in modern history. The arrival of multiple vaccines in recent mont…
 
Evan Osnos, presidential biographer and staff writer at The New Yorker, tells us what he sees in Biden’s early actions. Over the course of three weeks in January, the U.S. Capitol was the site of three major events, each of which could have filled its own chapter in the history books. Taken together, the insurrection of the U.S. Capitol, the second…
 
Columnist Katie Wilson tells us how the law created in the Gilded Age will help shape the next chapter of the Digital Age.As a concept, antitrust may seem fairly simple. Companies that get too big and abuse their powers to unfairly eliminate competition, and maybe drive up prices, must be brought to heel, either through regulation or a breakup. But…
 
Daudi Abe talks about four decades of hip-hop in the isolated, disrespected, idiosyncratic Northwest. From the moment "The Rapper's Delight" first played over the air of KYAC in Seattle, the trajectory of culture in the Pacific Northwest shifted. That song, performed by New Jersey's Sugarhill Gang and one of the earliest tracks in the history of hi…
 
Reporter Lilly Fowler discusses what years of reporting on Mergensana Amar tell us about U.S. immigration policy. The first time that Amar made news in the United States he was in the middle of a hunger strike, a protest against his failed bid for asylum and his imminent deportation after being held at the Northwest ICE Processing Center in Tacoma.…
 
Author Ruchika Tulshyan talks about the change that diversity can bring to a workplace when that workplace is the White House. When Kamala Harris walks into the White House on Jan. 20, she will be carrying with her a lot of firsts. She will be the first woman vice president of the United States, not to mention the first woman of color to hold the o…
 
Reporter Melissa Santos discusses the politics and path for the GOP's great West Coast hope. When Kim Wyman won re-election as Washington state's secretary of state earlier this month, she outperformed her party's gubernatorial and presidential candidates by double digits and became the GOP's only statewide elected official on the West Coast of the…
 
'Calling Bullshit' co-author Jevin West tells us how the attempts to delegitimize the presidential election could be warping the electorate. Misinformation has been a part of American politics since George Washington didn't have wooden teeth. But in the past decade lies and distortions have become central to the conversation about how our country i…
 
Talk radio host Michael Medved and political science professor Christopher Parker consider the future of the parties and the nation. There was no first-round knockout. In fact, while the result of the race for the American presidency was not immediately clear in the days following the election, the early vote totals quickly dispelled any notion tha…
 
Journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn revisit the struggles they found in America's blue collar communities. When the novel coronavirus came to the United States, it found a nation that was arguably already in a kind of existential crisis. America's life expectancy, a primary indicator of the nation's overall wellbeing, had dropped for thr…
 
Journalist Charles R. Cross tells us what live music has done for Seattle, and what could happen if local venues don’t see any economic relief. When the novel coronavirus took hold in Washington state, live music venues were some of the first businesses to go dark. It made sense. Little was known about the virus then, but it was clear that crowded …
 
Michael Kirk, the director of ‘The Choice,’ tells us what the presidential candidates’ response to tragedy, failure and humiliation tells us about how they lead. The two candidates are old. In fact, President Donald Trump was already the oldest American to assume the presidency when he was sworn in for his first term. Now he is four years older and…
 
Elie Mystal tells us why expanding the court isn't an outlandish idea, and how it might work. When Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away last month, her death marked the beginning of a fresh debate over the future of the Supreme Court. But the biggest question of that debate wasn't who would take her place. President Trump was expected to nominat…
 
Terrion Williamson, the director of the Black Midwest Initiative, discusses how parachute journalism is hurting Black people in America's heartland. When the video of Minneapolis police officers killing George Floyd went viral in the spring, the Minnesota metropolis quickly transformed into a theater of discontent as the nation's battle over race a…
 
Director Jeff Orlowski talks about his hit documentary and how his work on climate change helped him prepare to tell the story of social media run amok. In the early days of social media, the promise was real. By democratizing connection, a new breed of tech companies seemed to be doing good in the world: reuniting long-lost family and friends, pro…
 
Jacob Ward, host of 'Hacking Your Mind,' tells us why humans are more susceptible to misinformation and partisanship, and what we can do about it. Humanity is facing some daunting challenges right now. The pandemic, massive wildfires, civil unrest and economic uncertainty all threaten the livelihoods of billions on a daily basis. Such challenges de…
 
NBC News journalist Jacob Soboroff talks about Trump’s zero tolerance immigration policy, its origins and its possible return. When it was first reported that the United States government was systematically separating families at the southern border, the news was met with a kind of disbelief bolstered by a presidential administration that denied it…
 
Reporter Leah Sottile discusses how an internet meme became a violent new movement. When people began appearing at state capitols across the country in the spring, demanding that their governments rescind the restrictions put in place to contain the emergent coronavirus pandemic, there were well-known groups in attendance: Trump supporters, anti-va…
 
Conservative Washington Post columnist Henry Olsen discusses the split he sees between President Trump and many of the people who vote for him. When the Republican National Convention opens next week, it will be entering uncharted territory. Not just because of pandemic considerations that will prevent the party from packing an arena with delegates…
 
Reporter Levi Pulkkinen discusses his investigation into the prison health care system, where a treatable illness can put a prisoner in a body bag. Gross medical negligence in America's prisons isn't anything new. As long as there have been reporters investigating this nation's corrections departments there have been gruesome tales of medical proce…
 
This week, tech historian Margaret O’Mara visits us to discuss what could be in store for the Big Four. Last week's congressional hearings on Big Tech lacked some of the pomp and circumstance of previous antitrust hearings, but there was little doubt that it was a big deal. A gathering of that much raw economic power — even if it was via videoconfe…
 
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