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Roger Mifflin is the somewhat eccentric proprietor of The Haunted Bookshop, a second-hand bookstore in Brooklyn that is “haunted by the ghosts of all great literature.” Beginning with the arrival of a young advertising man and the mysterious disappearance of a certain volume from the shelves of the bookshop, a lively and often humorous tale of intrigue unfolds, generously sprinkled with liberal doses of Roger’s unique philosophy on literature and book selling.
 
The Bookshop Podcast is committed to helping independent bookshops thrive by highlighting these gems of the community, as well as illuminating the wonders of words on a page. Each week, we visit an independent bookshop, delve into what makes each one unique, introduce the wonderful people who work there, and discover what their customers are reading and loving. We interview local authors, support book launches and events, and help listeners find their next favorite armchair adventure.Buy Loc ...
 
Ever had a bookshop fantasy?An accidental journey begins in a small English language bookshop and leads you through the winding backstreets of Hanoi. Evocative bite-sized vignettes about life, circuses, the streets and the people of Vietnam’s northern capital. All the while battling counterfeiting book thugs, censorship and hiding out with Imperialist-Running-Dogs. Stories from Hanoi at the start of the new millennium, Cement Factory No.9 is an ode to a country in transition, where the rules ...
 
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show series
 
Daisy Lafarge’s Life Without Air (Granta), following on the tails of her pamphlets understudies for air and capriccio, is one of the mostly hotly-awaited debut collections of 2020. She read from the collection, and was in conversation about it with Rachael Allen, author of Kingdomland (Faber) and Lafarge’s editor at Granta. See acast.com/privacy fo…
 
Sometime around mid-March, my Earth Mother alter ego kicked in and has since gone into overdrive. Every few days, a malodorous smell wafts from the kitchen—that's the sourdough starter telling me it's ready for attention. I've lost count of how many pics of flowery-patterned loaves I've posted on Instagram. Gone are the bookish images and texts tha…
 
We've arrived at episode 5 of #MrBsJusticeSeason. Join us as we talk to journalist Maeve McClenaghan about her experience of a year investigating the homelessness crisis in the UK, and the book which emerged from this journey. 'No Fixed Abode' is a revealing and moving exploration of how very far the tragedy of homelessness has been allowed to deve…
 
London, the Capital of world capitalism, a centre of global finance and a place of immense wealth and privilege, has an often unacknowledged red underbelly, stretching from Herbert Morrison in the 1930s to Sadiq Khan in the 2020s. In Red Metropolis (Repeater), Tribune culture editor and historian Owen Hatherley looks back at that tradition, and arg…
 
1987 proved to be a year of major change for me. It was the year I worked with the exceptional David Bowie as the stylist on the music video Day in, Day Out, directed by Julian Temple, and after a lot of coaxing, I joined Bowie and the rest of the crew on the Glass Spider Tour. I left the tour after a few months for a variety of reasons, some relat…
 
Zimbabwean novelist, playwright and filmmaker Tsitsi Dangarembga presented her latest novel, the Booker-shortlisted This Mournable Body (Faber). The third in a trilogy which began with Nervous Conditions and continued with The Book of Not, This Mournable Body tells the ongoing story of Tambudzai and her struggles with patriarchy and the legacy of c…
 
During the 80s and 90s, I spent most of my time in Los Angeles working as a costume designer and stylist. My work included scouring thrift and vintage stores in Venice Beach, Santa Monica, Hollywood, and the valley. Magnolia Boulevard in Burbank and Lankershim Boulevard in North Hollywood were full of fabulous dinky stores overflowing with bargains…
 
In our event from 16 July 2019, Geoff Dyer talks to Frances Wilson about D.H. Lawrence. Dyer's Out of Sheer Rage, published in 1997, is a brilliant account of attempting to write, and most often failing, a book about his great hero D.H. Lawrence. Now, more than two decades later, he has edited a selection of Lawrence's essays for Penguin. Subjects …
 
I have a fondness for my local bookshop Bart’s Books, just as I’ve had for local corner bookshops wherever I’ve lived in the world. Plus, the fabulous crew of booksellers who work at Bart’s has saved my butt more than once when my muse has done a 180, and I’ve needed books for research at a moment’s notice. In this maiden voyage episode of The Book…
 
Welcome to The Bookshop! I’m your host Mandy Jackson-Beverly. Your local bookshop is a place of community, escape, learning, and adventure. A home away from home where familiar faces greet you and experiences wait patiently between the covers of a book. Here at The Bookshop, we’re committed to helping independent bookshops thrive by highlighting th…
 
The Justice Season of the podcast continues through the autumn 2020, a fortnight and many books at a time. For episode four, we're delighted to share a conversation with Zimbabwean writer Petina Gappah about her latest novel 'Out of Darkness, Shining Light'. It's a story twenty years in the making which follows the last journey of David Livingstone…
 
Writer and critic Brian Dillon’s latest book Suppose a Sentence (Fitzcarraldo) is a series of essays, each of them taking as its pretext a single sentence drawn from literature. What emerges is a dazzling experiment in criticism, a personal and at times polemical investigation of style, meaning and sense. Dillon was in conversation about his work w…
 
Novelist, memoirist, essayist and contributing editor to the LRB John Lanchester sets out to chill you to the virtual bone with his first ever collection of short fiction Reality and Other Stories (Faber). As if modern life weren’t unsettling enough, Lanchester makes it even more so with tales of haunted mobile phones, selfie sticks with demonic po…
 
In the third episode of our Justice Season, we talk to writer, poet, editor and all-round fantastic word- person John Freeman. Editor of the biannual Freemans, and former editor of Granta magazine, John is the author of books of nonfiction such as 'Dictionary of the Undoing', as well as two collections of poems: 'Maps' and 'The Park'. Since 2014 he…
 
The European Union Prize for Literature aims to put the spotlight on the creativity and diverse wealth of Europe’s contemporary literature and to promote the circulation of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. To discuss the prize, the state of European literature and Britain's place in the post-Brexit international literary community…
 
Join us as we plunge deeper into versions and stories of justice in the second episode of our autumn 2020 season. Niven Govinden is the author of five novels, most recently 'This Brutal House', which was published in 2019. In this episode, Jess chats to Niven about the vogue culture of New York City, chosen families, community, and 'eco-systems of …
 
In celebration of the life, work and legacy of William Trevor, one of the giants of modern Irish fiction, authors Salley Vickers, Kevin Barry, Hermione Lee and BBC Radio 4 Books Editor Di Speirs read from and talked about their favourites of his novels and short fiction, to mark the publication of Last Stories (Viking). Trevor, who died in 2016, wo…
 
We were joined by Toby Litt, Helen Charman, Lisa Kelly and Mary Jean Chan, four of the poets featured in Carcanet’s New Poetries VII. From the first anthology, published in 1994, through to this seventh volume, the series showcases the work of some of the most engaging and inventive new poets writing in English from around the world. The New Poetri…
 
Welcome back to the Mr B's podcast! After a long break, we're re-launching our mix of bookseller-chats and author interviews, but this time with a particular focus. Enter: the Justice Season. Throughout 2020 so far, it's been brought home to many of us how crises such as the pandemic lay bare the deep injustices around us, and how interlaced these …
 
Three-times Booker-nominated author and LRB editor-at-large Andrew O’Hagan’s latest novel centres on the powerful friendship between James and Tully, fuelled by teenage rebellion and the unforgettable soundtrack of late 80s British music. Stretching over three decades, Mayflies is a captivating study of adolescence becoming adulthood, with all the …
 
Igbo and Tamil writer and artist Akwaeke Emezi's mesmerising first novel Freshwater was published to universal acclaim in 2018, and was longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction. Their second book was Pet, a novel for young adults that raised difficult and pertinent questions about cultures of denial, and was described as ‘beautiful and genre-ex…
 
Novelist and essayist Kirsty Gunn’s latest novel Caroline’s Bikini is a powerful retelling of one of the oldest stories in western literature – that of unrequited love. In a series of conversations in West London bars, Gunn unravels the passion of financier Evan Gordonstone for the glamorous Caroline Beresford, an unravelling that brings Gordonston…
 
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